"The thing about cultural appropriation is that the appropriator does not have to face the same consequences that we do for practicing our culture or faith. For them, it is an accessory that can be taken on or off at will, while for us, it is a way of life. …in a society where immigrants and communities of color are marginalized at every level, we can’t pretend that power relations do not exist when we have this conversation about appropriation. Sharing and exchanging cultural and spiritual practices is great, but it gets more complicated when we’re not all on equal footing. It gets more complicated when meaningful things are taken, commodified, and exploited for a profit, with little respect shown to the community they were taken from."

Turbans on the Runway: What does it mean for Sikhs? by Sonny Singh Brooklynwala (July 10th, 2012)

(via xtremecaffeine)

@4 months ago with 8828 notes

“Broetry”, The Gender Gap, and Women-Only Spaces: An Interview with Quaint Magazine | Room Magazine 

alicedescends and I got interviewed by Room Magazine about Quaint, our publishing philosophies, and dealing with a white heteropatriarchal literary landscape. Ha!

@5 months ago with 6 notes
#Interviews #publishing #writing #women writers 

"[H]ow can we fetishize the act of eating so much while also making food more inaccessible to the people who need it the most? Who is benefiting from this? The setting-aside of food as social capital is logical within the aspirational framework of late capitalism; it makes sense for us to be celebrating the product over the worker and to implicitly shame the ones who cannot afford to shop in the same supermarket aisles as we can. It makes sense for us to colonize others’ traditional foods while critiquing new interpretations of those traditions by the same communities who strive to reinterpret their legacy back into the realm of meaning. In this way we enact little imperialisms that make it possible for us to pat ourselves on our backs, safe from “normal” food and the industrial processes that sustain an illusion of consciousness: trapped in an endless cycle of sleep, false awakening, and BPA-free Breakfast Bars."

@5 months ago with 27 notes
#food politics #ethics #my writing #bitch magazine #foodies #capitalism #social crit 

anemptyspace said: I just read your article on food gentrification, and I wanted to say thank you for putting that out there. This is incredibly important. And as an Asian that grew up in the Deep South, this hits home in a variety of ways. I have watched both of my food cultures, Louisiana Cajun and Creole and Korean, be co-opted by the white mainstream. They never understand the kind of cultural violence they inflict. They merely dismiss frustration as being backwards and small. It's about time people shot back.

Thank you so much for your kind words! I’m glad that my piece resonated with you and helped to validate your own experience. That’s the highest compliment I could receive.

@6 months ago with 8 notes
#anemptyspace 

Biting the Hand that Reads Us & a Call for Submissions

via Quaint Magazine

Coverage of female-identified writers and writers of color has become a hot topic recently. Who are we to complain? It’s important – vital, even – to address the imbalance, when it comes to publishing, reviewing and promoting writers of color, especially writers of color who identify as women. That’s why we started Quaint, and it’s why we’re so excited by literary journals like Room Magazine, Calyx, and Kalyani.

However, as hashtag activism and social justice on social media explode with support for people of color, women, trans* people and other communities typically excluded, not only from the literary sphere but from other, more essential and tangible spaces, the potential for the movement to be taken advantage of, to be used as a proverbial feather in one’s cap, increases.

Let’s all agree that we should not use diversity as a marketing tool. Let’s all agree that diversity isn’t something that we should pursue for a year, or a month; it isn’t something that should be pursued to fulfil a quota. And it isn’t something that we should attempt to capitalize off as a gimmick – not for internet brownie points, and most certainly not for money.

Read More

@7 months ago with 14 notes
#women writers #woc writers #writing #books #literature #intersectional feminism #book reviews 

wtulnews:

Gahiji and Kezia speak with Soleil Ho about Food Gentrification, the rising costs of food, and the effect of foodie trends on low-income communities.

@4 months ago with 36 note and 159 play
#interview #food gentrification #wtul #radio #listen to my awful voice 

"Craving the Other" in the classroom

nicosroom:

I came to school on Tuesday, March 11 with my expectations set fairly low. I teach first year composition at Miami University in Ohio. Needless to say, as a woman of color, it’s not always very fruitful when the classroom topic of the day is going to be race and ethnicity. I had assigned Soleil Ho’s short essay, “Craving the Other” from Bitch Magazine’s food issue and I arrive that morning ready for their resistance and their hesitation. I started our class with a writing activity which I have been calling the food-nationality quiz. This consisted of me presenting eight nationalities to the students and their task was to name five foods that they associate with each. They struggled most with Ethiopian and Thai. Some are not very sure that there is a difference between Greek and Italian cuisine. They proudly declare that pizza, hot dogs, and hamburgers are the three most ubiquitous American foods around. Most concerning to me was that so many of them are convinced that “shrimp,” “chicken,” and “pork,” unmodified ingredients in their own right all belong to specific nationalities.

The next step, was the student led discussion on the essay. CC and PC were the students in charge today. The average student led discussion consists of a 15-minute block of class time where getting responses out of their peers is like pulling teeth. This day, something changed. Was it the 60-something degree dawning of Spring? Was it the email I had sent with the scary chart of the participation rates from the semester so far with the friendly reminder that midterm grades were due at Spring Break? Maybe any and all of these things, but I was floored by the way this discussion proceeded.

CC and PC’s questions:
1. Was [Ho] going too far in her accusations [against Americans]? Student 1 responded that he wasn’t sure. There is a level authenticity of expected when we [by which he means White Americans] eat ethnic foods. His example, in a Mexican restaurant, he expects the food to be prepared and served by Mexican people. Otherwise, he thinks it is a chain restaurant. This was quickly followed up by Student 2’s response: that he disagreed upon first reading since he was of the persuasion that food is a medium for connecting with people who are not like us and that sometimes food is the only connection.
2. What, in general, is the point [Ho] is trying to make? Student 3 responded that we shouldn’t be associating entire cultures with a very limited number of foods. Student 4 agreed and added that we don’t know as much as we think we do about specific cultures just because we have eaten some foods ascribed to them. Student 5 went on to say that our focus on foods as markers of cultures implies that food is the only thing we are willing to know about other people and places. A sixth student chimed in, referring to the point of the essay when Ho writes that her own consumption of Vietnamese foods did not help her better understand Vietnamese culture or history. He noted that if that is the case for Ho, it is even more true for someone like himself, who is much further removed from knowing anything about Vietnamese history or experience.
3. How are the situation’s [Ho] describes similar to the ways we treat St. Patrick’s Day and Green Beer Day? Student 7: we do the same things, pretending we know so much about Ireland, telling people we are “Irish” even if we don’t know anything about it, just as an excuse to spend the day[s] “drinking like the Irish do.”
4. Why does Ho use the examples from popular media like “Asian Girlz” and Bizarre Foods? Student 8: She is trying to point out that mass media is guilty of this as much as we as individuals are. Since we look to mass media as an authority and source of credibility, we learn these stereotypes from the media.
5. What do you think of [Ho’s] perspective of wanting to be like White Americans when she gives the examples such as the rice and cold cut meats? Student 9 responded: we never think about it, but it’s the same situation for us. We get tired of those things we eat all the time and we want to try something else.

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Wow! What an incredible compliment, Nicolyn. I’m really glad my writing has been useful to you :)

@5 months ago with 20 notes
#grad school #teaching #pedagogy #good vibes 

Submit to Quaint! 

Lovely ladies of the internet, send Quaint Magazine your nonfiction! I promise that I will treat it with care.

@6 months ago with 4 notes
#nonfiction #writing opportunities #literary magazine #intersectional feminism 

The Minotaur 

My first-ever published essay is now on Medium and looks snazzy as hell!

@7 months ago with 3 notes
#tw: abuse #creative nonfiction #memoir #essays #childhood 

"So when Whole Foods reaches into our cultures and our souls and plucks out something they deem fit to sell, what course of action could we possibly take? The apparatus has already been put into full swing: customers are already pre-registering for collard cooking classes, cashiers are already wearing “Collards are the New Kale!” buttons on their aprons, derivative blog posts are already queued up for publication, and trend analysts are surely already mapping out the apex of the greens’ cultural trajectory.

If anything, the crucial importance of #foodgentrification lies in the way it enables participants to expose a particular piece of economic inequality that operates with a glossy, do-gooder façade. It’s difficult to avoid feeling like you’re not complicit in systems of food insecurity after reading through the hashtag, and the questions that it raises are ones that we should have been asking ourselves a long time ago, well before it got to tofu, then acai, then kale, then collards.

"

"#FoodGentrification and Culinary Rebranding of Traditional Foods" for Bitch Media by Soleil Vy Ho
@7 months ago with 465 notes
#foodgentrification #racism #whole foods #foodies #food justice #feminism #cultural appropriation